Pretty DIY Tea Towel for Spring

Sew a One of a Kind Pretty Tea Towel

These pretty tea towels are large and the material coordinates with a cushion I made.  You could also make matching table runners or curtain tie backs or heating pads as well.  The spring line of adorable tea towels in the stores are too cute to leave on the shelf; I always grab at least four.  I still prefer these as they are larger and one of a kind.
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Pretty DIY tea towel, make your own tea towel, spring tea towels, pretty tea towels, diy blogs, craft blogs

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My first choice was to sew my own flour sack clothes, but there was no flour sack material to be found.  Plan B was to use purchased flour sack tea towels so that’s what I did.  I purchased the largest flour sack clothes I could find 30″ by 36″.

For this post I made two different styles, each one requires the same supplies.

To make one pretty tea towel you will need:

Flour sack cloth tea towel or material.

3 styles of coordinating fabric at least 2″ wider than the flour sack towel.

Sewing machine, needle, coordinating thread.

Scissors, rule, iron.

Prewash and iron all your material prior to cutting.

I will start with the Prairie Point Tea Towel Tutorial, then the Ruffled Tea Towel Tutorial.

Lets get started.

Prairie Point Tea Towel

To made the 4 inch wide strips, cut the material 6″ high, and two inches wider than your flour sack towel.

For the prairie points cut ONE piece of material 8″ high and four inches wider than your towel.

It is easiest if you have a cutting wheel and quilting mat.  My cutting wheel needs replacing so these were cut using  just scissors and a ruler.

Although the actual sewing of this tea towel is super easy and super fast, I need to point out the importance of ironing the seam edges Very Straight before sewing.

Find a pattern in your material and fold over 1″ top.  Press well and double check this top fold is very straight.  Once that is done, place your ruler on the seam and fold over and press the bottom seam exactly 4″ from the top.

Once you have the outer edges pressed well fold the edges in and press.  Doing it this way makes sure your outer edges are exact.  If your cutting wasn’t perfect the cutting edge is hidden.
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Pretty DIY tea towel, make your own tea towel, spring tea towels, pretty tea towels, diy blogs, craft blogs

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To Make Easy Prairie Points

Prairie points are typically a real pain to put together,  cutting, folding, pinning and then sewing each point.  I  knew there had to be an easier way, after some research I found the perfect video tutorial from Fave Quilts.  Here are my step by step instructions. I outlined the four stages in one photo for you.
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Pretty DIY tea towel, make your own tea towel, spring tea towels, pretty tea towels, diy blogs, craft blogs
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  1.  Fold your cut prairie point material in half, press well.  starting at one edge,  mark one side of the material every four inches.  You can use chalk or snip it with the scissors your choice.  Complete the entire side.

Go to the other side of your material and starting at the edge mark 2″ in from the edge, and then every four inches after.  This will give you staggered marks.  Then carefully cut each mark to the center crease, getting as close as possible without going over.  The hardest part is done.

2.  Fold each “strip” in half diagonally and press.

3.  Fold the triangle in half again forming the  point.

4.  Form all the points down one side, then fold them all along the other.  Fold all the points into a line. ”   You end up with a single strip of prairie points staggered by 2. I love this method and won’t ever use the other method again.

Now that you have all four strips prepared, now comes the easiest part.

Sewing

Center the prairie point strip on top of the lower strip ( mine is blue). Sew as close to the edge as possible.
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Pretty DIY tea towel, make your own tea towel, spring tea towels, pretty tea towels, diy blogs, craft blogsa

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Pretty DIY tea towel, make your own tea towel, spring tea towels, pretty tea towels, diy blogs, craft blogsNow that you have the prairie points attached. Leave a little gap at the bottom to show some of the white flour sack.  Center the strip on the flour sack and sew the bottom edge.

Center your top strip pink floral) over the prairie point edge and sew. Sew the top edge.

Now that all the strips are attached, press well. Flip over.

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Pretty DIY tea towel, make your own tea towel, spring tea towels, pretty tea towels, diy blogs, craft blogsWorking from the back cut the uneven edges even to about 1″ from the edge of the towel. Turn the edges over to form a tiny hem and press.  Sew into place and repeat for the other side.

Iron and  hang.

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Ruffled Edge Tea Towel
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Pretty DIY tea towel, make your own tea towel, spring tea towels, pretty tea towels, diy blogs, craft blogs

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The actual sewing of this tea towel is even faster than the prairie point tea towel.

Cutting the material is easier if you have a cutting wheel and quilting mat.  My cutting wheel needs replacing so these cuts were made using  scissors and a ruler.

Cut three strips of material.  For the ruffle cut one 5″ high strip, the entire width of your material. For the wide section cut one 5″ high strip, 4″ wider than your flour sack towel. Finally for the thin section, cut one 3″ high strip 4″ wider than your flour sack towel.

 I need to point out the importance of ironing the seam edges Very Straight before sewing.

Find a pattern in your material and fold over 1″ top.  Press well and double check the top fold is very straight.  Repeat for the bottom,  double check that its even with a ruler.

Once you have the outer edges pressed well fold the edges in and press.  Doing it this way makes sure your outer edge is exact.  If your cutting wasn’t perfect the cutting edge is hidden.

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Pretty DIY tea towel, make your own tea towel, spring tea towels, pretty tea towels, diy blogs, craft blogs

Making and Attaching the Ruffle.

Fold over the long edge of your ruffle material 1″ and press very well.  Fold the material inside to form a hem.  Repeat this on the other edge and sew.

With a needle and thread baste the unsewn edge.  Gather into ruffles, spread it out to match the width of your towel.  Pin the corners in place first ,make the ruffles as even as possible.  The wider your material the more significant your ruffles will be.

Sew to the underside of the flour sack towel.

Sewing

Pretty DIY tea towel, make your own tea towel, spring tea towels, pretty tea towels, diy blogs, craft blogs

Center your nest  strip (pink floral) and inch from the tea towel edge and sew.  This leaves a little white strip showing

Center and overlap your thinnest strip ( plain pink)on top of the floral and sew top and bottom.

Working from the back cut the uneven edges even to about 1″ from the edge of the towel.

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Pretty DIY tea towel, make your own tea towel, spring tea towels, pretty tea towels, diy blogs, craft blogsFold the edges to form a even hem along the edge.  Sew to form the edge.

Press and Iron.

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I hope you enjoy this tutorial.  Please comment if you did.  Receiving feedback is a wonderful thing.

Pretty DIY tea towel, make your own tea towel, spring tea towels, pretty tea towels, diy blogs, craft blogs

57 thoughts on “Pretty DIY Tea Towel for Spring

    1. Hi Carolann: Everything I sew is really simple as I never purchase patterns or sew cloths or anything really elaborate. If you ever want to try one of my tutorials you can always message me with questions.

      I appreciate the feedback. Enjoy your week. Leanna

    1. Hi Marci: These would look beautiful in your farmhouse style home. Not sure how many more I will have time to sew this Spring but I am certainly going to make some for the other seasons.

      Thank you for commenting. Leanna

    1. Hi Debra: Its hard to describe how much nicer these are then the purchased Spring towels are. They are larger and stand out more somehow. Let me know when you try them or something similar. Love to here how it worked out for you.

    1. These are very easy to put together Pam. Try the tutorial and like I told CarolAnn if you have any extra questions, go ahead and ask.

      Thanks for commenting and I am glad you like them.

    1. This method works like a charm. Getting everything square is way too fiddly, all that ironing and pinning. One day I dream of you needing my advice on a project, heaven knows I rely on your expertise regularly lol.

      Hugs and I hope you have a great week. Leanna

    1. That’s great Jennifer. I put that cushion as a backdrop to illustrate how you could use little tidbits of the leftover material to add coordinated decor. That cushion is not quite totally finished. Once I get the applique stitch done on the outside I will include is as a tutorial with another cushion I have just finished making.

      Thank you for the feedback. Comments are so lovely to receive. Leanna

  1. Pretty! I love projects that add a little personal touch without being to hard to tackle in an afternoon. That prairie points technique is a really unique one. Cute!

    1. Hi Alayna: Doing the little prairie points this way makes this little project fun and easy. Your right about having projects to do in a day or so. We are all very busy it seems. If I have a larger project I always chop it up into little bite sizes activities over a few days or weeks. That way it remains interesting and not a chore.

      Thank you for writing. Comments are appreciated.

    1. Hi Julie: The prairie points added a little extra. Thank you for the feedback on the tutorial. I decided to do all the stages in one photograph instead of in stages. Good to know it was easily read and understandable.

    1. Hi Roseann: Hubs and I took a few days trip into the USA. I purchased this material and craft supplies when I was down there. Hobby Lobby is a destination vacation for crafting Canadians lol.

      Thank you for the comment.

    1. Hi Sam: Frankly prairie points are a pain. I am straight line challenged so all the folding and fiddling irks me. Doing it this way was really easy and fun. If I get some time I want to do some more Easter themed tea towels.

      Thanks for commenting.

  2. Leanna, I learned something new today! I was not familiar with Prairie Points until this post…so thanks.
    And how adorbs are these tea towels! Perfect for farmhouse and for spring!
    Thanks for the inspiration.

    Hugs, LYnn

    1. Thank you Lynn. The little bit of “quilting” did give them a farmhouse feel, I really hope to make some with bunnies or lambs before Easter. Thank you for stopping by.

    1. Hi Florence: I recommend it, these ones don’t look anything like the purchased ones do. They can be easily done in an afternoon and they are much more about ironing then they are sewing.

      Thank you for commenting Florence. I appreciate your time and feedback.

    1. Hi Carole. Thank you for commenting, as you have a quilting blog I am really excited to have you comment on my post with my little bit of prairie squares. Thank you for the thumbs up.

    1. Hi Cheryl: I very rarely sew anything that requires a pattern. I define myself more as a crafter then a sewer. All of the things I put on the blog are easy to sew. When you sew it feel free to email me if you have any questions.

    1. Hi Melony: So nice of you to say. I actually had to learn things out of necessity. I always had a “need” for pretty and raising the boys on my own meant I had to make things out of what I had. I appreciate this comment very much. Have an amazing week.

    1. Hi Carol: Thanks for the comment, these are really easy to do. Its not so much about talent as it is patience to iron the edges straight.

      Have a great week and thanks for stopping by.

  3. These are such beautiful towels, remind me of vintage and would be amazing in a shabby chic style as well as any summer look. I am pinning to my Shabby Chic kitchen board…love them! Not sure I can do the prairie points, but they really make these look like towels that were either hand-made by grandma OR from the priciest boutique in town!

    1. I promise Deb, if I can sew them you can sew them. This new method is such an improvement over the old individual prairie points.

      The only thing is you have to be very careful and precise when your ironing. The sewing part is four straight lines.

    1. Thanks Maria: I am going to make some more different types of towels. The idea that you can match them to other little bits of decor is very appealing to me.

      Thank you for your stopping by. Leanna

    1. Hi Meredith: Thank you. I believe you can never have too many tea towels. These ones turned out really well. I appreciate the feedback. Leanna

  4. Leanna, your tea towels are lovely. They’re perfect for spring. Thanks for sharing at Snickerdoodle. We’ll be featuring this at tomorrow’s party. Hope to see you there!

    1. That’s wonderful Beverly. I enjoy the Snickerdoodle link party and have been joining in weekly for quite a while. Exciting, I look forward to seeing it featured. Love it, thanks!

    1. Hi Michelle: Glad you like them. They were fun and easy to put together. Only took an afternoon. Enjoy your week my friend.

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